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Frugal Celiacs
For Frugal People, especially those w/ Celiacs Disease or Gluten Intolerance.

Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2008-07-11 00:59
Subject: A Frugal Healthy Grocery Budget
Security: Public
This is good blog article on how to lower your grocery costs while remaining healthy. It has tips that can be used by people with and without gluten issues. Click the link to read the article: A Frugal Healthy Grocery Budget
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2008-01-16 21:45
Subject: Favorite Frugal Recipe or Cooking Tip
Security: Public
What is your favorite frugal gluten free recipe?

(For those who do not avoid gluten, you can post your favorite frugal recipe that does not have any wheat, barley, oats or rye products.)

If you don't have a recipe, then what is your favorite frugal cooking tip?
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-10-24 14:44
Subject: Simple Russet Potato Soup
Security: Public
Click here for recipe.

This soup was very easy, inexpensive, and tasty. It uses ingredients that most people have in their kitchens at any given moment and can be easily altered to include more ingredients (like bacon, shredded cheese, broccoli, carrots, corn, and more). My fiance is asking me to make more soon. Enjoy.
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-08-01 01:18
Subject: Two New Frugal Recipes
Security: Public
I added two recipes to frugalceliac.

Fresh Raw Pickles (Refrigerator Pickles) Based off a recipe my grandmother and mother use.

Zucchini with Mint and Dill This is a recipe I came up with and cooked tonight that would be gentle and nourishing to Mr. Frugal's belly. He wasn't feeling well (headache, nausea, etc), but this was easy on his stomach and it helped him feel a bit better. He was able to eat a normal serving amount.

Enjoy. :-)
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-07-05 10:37
Subject: Tasty and ever Frugal Casseroles!
Security: Public
One frugal one-pot meal is casseroles. Versatile and tasty, this culinary 'frankenstein' can be very easy on the budget, and a last ditch effort for foods that are not at their peak anymore.

A good number of people make leftovers into soups and stews. I remember well the concoctions my mother would come up with. I've never been one for the leftover soup route. In truth, I love the heartiness of a good casserole, even if just a hodge-podge of leftovers.

Take few remaining bits of veggies in that tupperware bowl resting in your fridge and the handful of frozen stuff that seemed to have crystalized in their bags while residing in the abyss of your freezer, and add some meats that might be freezer burned. Be sure that you thawed and browned/seared the meat. You can also use some meat that was cooked earlier that week. Mix in some leftover rice, GF noodles, or potatoes. Be sure to add some seasonings if you wish. Place in a casserole dish, or a baking dish (pan, cake, or bread dish). Then pour some quickly made homemade sauce (even if just a gluten-free soup that you reduced and thickened with cornstarch or some gluten-free flour). You can even add cheese to the mix (which can act as an extra binder to hold the casserole together). Cook until hot all the way through (which is why you cooked the meat some before putting it in). Stir it a couple time if you want, or sprinke more cheese on top for presentation. Let cool for about 15 minutes, and serve!

Few things are easier or less expensive. The best part is that you are wasting less food, and making space in your fridge while doing so!
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-06-28 12:27
Subject: Cucumber Summer Salad (original recipe)
Security: Public
Mr. Frugal insisted I write down the recipe of the Cucumber, Tomato, and Onion salad that I made last night.

Click here for the recipe!
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-06-20 15:00
Subject: Quantity vs. Quality
Security: Public
"When you're poor you can't afford to be cheap." -mylittlelovely

I read that a while back and felt it was such an interesting concept, I put it on my LJ profile page.

It really gets you thinking. How many of us, in the mad rush to save, forget that quality is just as important as how much you can buy with that dollar? This is actually an issue I've seen brought up several times.

Sure, you will end up paying higher prices for quality items in the short term. However, in the long run, many times it ends up costing you less than the cheap items you got for a fraction of the cost (less replacements, more use, etc). People also will usually take care of the more expensive, quality item than they would the cheap stuff. Of course, you might luck out on finding a good quality item in the discount stores, but that doesn't happen often. And if you keep your eyes open, you can find a lot of great quality items in the more expensive stores, marked down to incredibly low prices (even lower than thrift store prices)!

This can also work with food. Farm grown items will typically cost less if you buy it from farmer's markets, but not always. Organic can be pricy, but I've also seen it with prices that rival that of the 'normal produce'. The question becomes, what's more important to me when it comes to food. I like the idea of not ingesting so many chemicals, antibiotics, and pesticides. Most importantly, I like the idea of a tomato tasting like a tomato!

After tasting my first piece of dry aged beef, I can honestly say that the pull of the regular beef sold at the grocery stores are not as tempting. Granted, the cost is quite a bit higher. Yet, if the cost for the beef I like is high, then I'll buy less of it and use it more carefully. I will also eat less of it and probably increase my use of other proteins, such as eggs and beans. By doing this, the overall cost of my food will level out or even be less! Spoilage will also not be as much of an issue, and over indulgence would be set aside. Talk about healthier, more economic, and more eco-friendly!

Granted, I'd still buy certain items in bulk to save some money, but that's more for things like rice and such.

So, do you have a story or thoughts on quality vs. quantity?
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Me posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: crazypumpkin
Date: 2007-06-12 09:53
Subject: whole quinoa for breakfast
Security: Public
I've found I really like whole quinoa for breakfast. I think it has something to do with the consistency and how it pops in my mouth when I chew it. It's also a hell of a lot cheaper than GF cereal. I think I've been paying under $2 a pound consistently, and 1 cup cooked yields about three servings for me. The only thing that sucks is that the first morning cooking it takes 15 minutes, and my brain has problems with that sometimes. Yes, I could cook it the night before, but then I'd have to be even more organized ;)

It tastes like crap on it's own to me, but carries flavors well. Here are the few combos I've done so far with it:
-brown sugar and cinammon (this is probably the most common, as my morning fogged brain can handle it easily)
-frozen strawberries, brown sugar, and cinammon
-frozen raspberries and brown sugar
-a few pieces of crumbled bacon (VERY yummy)
-apple butter (I was desperate a few mornings and didn't have much else in the house)
I think I might have added sliced almonds into a few of those too.

What else can you think of that might be easy and go well with morning quinoa?
For whatever reason, I find that I like my breakfast food as breakfast food and rarely can I stomach 'other meal' foods at breakfast (I've yet to figure out why). So while I know that quinoa tastes good cook in chicken stock and served with broccoli and chicken, I know I couldn't eat that for breakfast.
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-05-30 20:05
Subject: Cheaper, Healthier Decisions
Security: Public
There's one thing I've found funny since starting my gluten free lifestyle. When people ask, "You can eat beef?" while we are discussion recipes and such. I usually have to hold back my amusement. I'm talking about the people who were told (even a number of times) what gluten is and what grains must be avoided.

I usually look at these people with a smile on my face and say, "Does beef have wheat in it?" A similar response applies for when they ask how I can eat vegetables, fruits, rices, and so on. Sometimes I get a chuckle from the querient, sometimes a look of confusion. Nonetheless, it's best to keep a good sense of humor about it all. Same applies when people ask if I want some crackers or toast when I feel sick (from accidently injesting gluten), or when it's suggested that I toast the bread to make it safe. Of course, to the latter, I'd respond, "Does cooking meat kill the protein?"


The best way I explain the basic and usually safest foods is like this. "The closer you get to the pure state of the food when you buy it, the safer it tends to be, except in the case of the grains containing the gluten protein." The less processed, the better. Fresh produce (veggies, fruit, etc), meats, dried beans, and rice being prime examples.

However, this applies to generally living healthy and saving money. Typically, the less processing the food goes through, the more nutritious and less costly it will tend to be. The main exception is frozen produce, which is said to be more nutrition (because it's frozen in it's prime) and can be very inexpensive, especially when bought on sale.

So, to save money, eat healthier, and safer, choose foods that are the least processed prior to being bought. Even if only 1/2 to 2/3 of your cart is made up of these items, you are bound to notice a difference in your body and your pockets.


(Cross posted to frugalceliac)
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Frugal Celiac posting in Frugal Celiacs
User: frugalceliac
Date: 2007-05-30 18:36
Subject: Frugal Living
Security: Public
"In my opinion, all it takes to be considered frugal is to think before you purchase something."

"Frugal shoppers are careful. They take care of their money and make the most of it. Many frugal shoppers actually have everything they want and the satisfaction that it doesn't hurt them financially. They spend time to make wise decisions. They learn how to make their dollars really work for them, instead of against them. They have more for less money."

"Frugal living is about reducing what you spend, living within your means, using what you have and taking care of your belongings, including your money. It is about making goals and working to reach them. Which would you rather be: the person who decides when and where to spend his money or the person whose money is spent before he makes it?"

Read the full article here.
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